Fleeing and Eluding in Michigan

Ran from policeMichigan statute makes it a crime for the driver of a car that is given a signal by hand, speech, flashing lights, or siren by a police to increase speed, turn the vehicle lights off, fail to stop, or attempt to flee. If you have been charged with fleeing and eluding you could be facing loss of your license, massive fines, and even prison time. Call (734) 453-7806 today to speak with a criminal defense lawyer. 

This law only applies when the police officer is lawfully acting within the duties of their job.  The police officer must also be in uniform and in a marked police vehicle.

Degrees of Fleeing and Eluding

Fleeing and eluding is brown down into four degrees with fourth degree fleeing and eluding being the least serious and first degree being the most serious in terms of possible punishment.

First-degree fleeing and eluding is charged when the alleged violation results in the death of another individual.

Second-degree fleeing and eluding is charged when the alleged violation results in someone having a serious impairment of a bodily function, the person being charged with fleeing and eluding has a prior conviction for first, second, or third degree fleeing and eluding, or two prior convictions for fourth degree fleeing and eluding.

Third-degree fleeing and eluding is charged when the alleged violations results in a crash, or occurred in an area where the marked speed limit is 35 miles per hour or less, or the person charged has a prior fourth-degree fleeing and eluding.

Fourth-degree fleeing and eluding is charged when a person violates the law but does not fit into any of the degrees above.

Penalties for Fleeing and Eluding

First Degree is punishable by up to 15 years in prison and $15,000.00 in fines.

Second Degree is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and $10,000.00 in fines.

Third Degree is punishable by up to 5 years in prison and $5,000.00 in fines.

Fourth Degree is punishable by up to 2 years in prison and $2,000.00 in fines.